Review: Children of Virtue and Vengeance by Tomi Adeyemi

Review: Children of Virtue and Vengeance by Tomi Adeyemi

‘After battling the impossible, Zélie and Amari have finally succeeded in bringing magic back to the land of Orïsha. But the ritual was more powerful than they could’ve imagined, reigniting the powers of not only the maji, but of nobles with magic ancestry, too.

Now, Zélie struggles to unite the maji in an Orïsha where the enemy is just as powerful as they are. But with civil war looming on the horizon, Zélie finds herself at a breaking point: she must discover a way to bring the kingdom together or watch as Orïsha tears itself apart.’

My favourite things about this series so far have to be the worldbuilding and the magic. I love the way the use of magic is described, the way in which Adeyemi writes making it an almost tangible thing. I like that it it grounded in the physical and not all flashing lights and invisible strength, and that there is, more often than not, a cost for power wielded, consequences making it a system that feels more realistic and something that should be respected. I’m sure I’ve mentioned before that I’m not a big fan of overpowered characters who pay no price for the powers they can use, and while there are some characters that can use magic without direct consequence to themselves, the damage they cause to others is devastating, whether they mean it to be or not. Primarily, magic is honoured and not exploited, and there’s a real human impact felt whenever it goes awry in the course of learning how it can be used and uncovering all that has been lost.

Zélie has a lot to work through over the course of the novel, and in its opening pages is still attempting to come to terms with the events that occurred at the conclusion of Children of Blood and Bone, to the extent that her relationship with her magic is fractured and brings her immense guilt. That she has to constantly face the fact that what she has tried to do for her people has also gifted their enemies with what appears to be a more powerful and destructive force is something that she struggles with, especially when interacting with Amari, who only serves as a reminder of what she’s fighting against and the ‘mistake’ that she has made. Despite this, she still cares for Amari and initially attempts to conceal her feelings because of this, fighting against the urge to lash out at her for claiming what she has always revered of her heritage for her own, however without intent. While trying to work through the trauma of what she has recently lived through, she also has to handle her new role in her community and how others see her now, something else that she has difficulty coping with, particularly as her life all the more frequently asks for sacrifice after sacrifice from her for a broader good.

To my mind, one of the strongest features of Children of Virtue and Vengeance is the host of characters who spend a lot of time convincing themselves and manipulating others into believing that they are doing what is best for Orïsha. Admittedly, I spent a lot of time internally screaming at some of them to better anticipate the consequences of their actions and see through the deceptions that others were feeding them to use them for their own means. Amari’s mother in particular remains a despicable woman, both in her attitude towards her daughter and how she alters her behaviour to convince others that she is not a threat and only wishes the best for them and for Orïsha. The trauma that Amari’s formative years have caused to how she sees herself, her destiny and others becomes more and more evident as the story unfolds, making her more dangerous to herself and others as her idea of what is ‘best’ becomes more and more warped. I can’t really go into much detail about the main culprit and perhaps most self-deceiving of the cast (in my opinion), as I think it’s too much of a major spoiler, but that they let themselves be led and manipulated to the extent that they saw what they had been fed as truth was one of the main things that had me silently yelling (in a good way) at pages for them to wake up.

To be completely honest, I wasn’t too invested in the romantic elements of the story, as I felt that there was so much more at stake that it felt a little like an unnecessary addition, or something that wouldn’t be at the forefront of the character’s minds while in the situations that they are in. However, this is not to say that I was complete averse to them, and I particularly felt for Amari, as she struggles with what she feels she has to do and what she knows it stands to cost her, especially having experienced an upbringing where affection was not something that she received from any source that she could rely on (and she has already lost the one person who seemed to truly care for her in her youth). I’m not quite sure how I feel about the romances that Zélie engages in, particularly because they both read as quite unhealthy, made more so by the fact that it seems she is using one as a way of trying to forget the other. This said, her behaviour in terms of relationships often reads as quite instinctive and impulsive, and not necessarily always thought through, despite her attempts to, the weight on her shoulders and likelihood of impending death things that don’t afford her the opportunity to be entirely reasonable and rational about everything.

Children of Virtue and Vengeance is a brilliantly written and thought provoking read, and out today! I look forward to seeing how the story unfolds in the final book of the trilogy! Thank you to Pan Macmillan & MyKindaBook for sending me a copy for review!

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