Review: Sword in the Stars by Cori McCarthy & Amy Rose Capetta

Review: Sword in the Stars by Cori McCarthy & Amy Rose Capetta

Ari Helix may have won her battle against the tyrannical Mercer corporation, but the larger war has just begun. Ari and her cursed wizard Merlin must travel back in time to the unenlightened Middle Ages and steal the King Arthur’s Grail — the very definition of impossible. It’s imperative that the time travellers not skew the timeline and alter the course of history. Coming face to face with the original Arthurian legend could produce a ripple effect that changes everything. Somehow Merlin forgot that the past can be even more dangerous than the future.’

I adored Once & Future and have been looking forward to Sword in the Stars for a good many months, so I was very grateful to be given an E-ARC by the publisher. I’m glad to say that Sword in the Stars does not disappoint and, in my opinion, doesn’t suffer from the lack of momentum that second books in duologies and trilogies tend to. One of the things that saves it from doing so is that it picks up almost immediately after the events of the first book and doesn’t spend the first few chapters recapping what happened in Once & Future, instead dedicating this time to moving the story forward. The pacing is good, balancing enough time with the characters in ways that develop them and their motives with action and learning about the outside influences that are affecting them. There is very little time when there is nothing significant happening, which prevents the narrative from stagnating.

Gwen and Ari remain one of my favourite couples and I love that there are so many plot pieces in Sword in the Stars that are often used in fiction as reasons for couples for have misunderstandings and for relationships to break down that are actually used as things that bring them closer together and keep them together. Both of them are unpredictable and delightfully headstrong, and while this sometimes leads them being surprised by each other and not anticipating exactly what they’re going to do, they don’t chastise each other for it or seek to have the other change to make things any easier on them. They see and applaud each other’s strengths, and while Ari’s role is that of the ‘hero’, Gwen is by no means any less significant, clever or strong, and it’s fantastic to see a couple who are unapologetically themselves and not expected to be ‘less’ for the convenience of their partner or the story. I would love to write a lot more about the both of them, but I don’t want to ruin the book for anyone!

Another of the things that I liked about the narrative is what the characters discover about themselves and their roles in history by trying to adhere to the narrative they know, while trying to figure out how to manipulate it just enough that what they do remains what everyone knows of the tale – if there was ever even any other chain of events. I love stories that play with time travel and time loops (and what if/cause and effect, etc), and I got a huge kick out of all the contemplation of paradoxes and the looks at how myths (and history) are manipulated as they’re transformed through literature and the social consciousness of different eras.

Sword in the Stars is a brilliant blend of fairytale retelling, science fiction and social commentary and I enjoyed every minute of it (I would be very, very happy to read more about Ari and co at some point in the future!). The cast as whole is hugely likeable, though characters are not without their flaws, and it’s very easy to want good things for all of them and hope that they will succeed both in their relationships and in what the overarching narrative needs them to accomplish to protect the wider universe from the corrupt Mercer. Highly recommended!

I received a digital ARC from Netgalley and the publisher.

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