Review: Bookish and the Beast by Ashley Poston

Review: Bookish and the Beast by Ashley Poston

‘On the other hand, Vance Reigns has been Hollywood royalty for as long as he can remember—with all the privilege and scrutiny that entails. When a tabloid scandal catches up to him, he’s forced to hide out somewhere the paparazzi would never expect to find him: Small Town USA. At least there’s a library in the house. Too bad he doesn’t read.

When Rosie and Vance’s paths collide and a rare book is accidentally destroyed, Rosie finds herself working to repay the debt. And while most Starfield superfans would jump at the chance to work in close proximity to the Vance Reigns, Rosie has discovered something about Vance: he’s a jerk, and she can’t stand him. The feeling is mutual.  

But as Vance and Rosie begrudgingly get to know each other, their careful masks come off—and they may just find that there’s more risk in shutting each other out than in opening their hearts.’

Bookish and the Beast is the third in the Once Upon a Con series, that takes fairytales and introduces them to a modern setting, focusing on the world of fandom, conventions and the media. It’s one of my all-time favourite series, primarily because Poston writes about fandom in a way that I’ve seen no other author authentically achieve when portraying characters who have a love of a particular TV show, game, movie, book, etc, showing a real affection and depth of understanding about what fandom brings to the lives of those involved in it. There is no subtle mockery or suggestion that the reader ought to think that what Rosie (or any of the other characters in the books) feels about Starfield is odd or not as fulfilling as anything else people choose to take part in for fun. Poston writes about friendship and fandom bringing people together and giving them creative outlets, which, in my experience, is what it’s all about. I know that one of the first things I said to one of my very best friends (Hi, Laura!) was a comment about the sci-fi show Farscape way back more years than I think either of would care to admit.

Bookish and the Beast is a retelling of Beauty and the Beast, told from the point of view of Rosie, a fan of Starfield, and Vance, who turns out to be playing ‘the bad guy’ in the movie adaptations of the Starfield Universe. After having damaged a book from a collection that doesn’t belong to her, Rosie agrees to make amends by cataloguing and arranging the library from which it came, leaving her often in the company of a taciturn and irritable Vance, who is trying to avoid the public eye and adding another scandal to his unfortunate list of incidents and poor decisions. Over the course of sorting out the library, which Vance reluctantly begins to assist with (though far less reluctantly before long), the two begin to consider each other and their own behaviour and decisions in a different light, and begin to bond over the Starfield books that Rosie adores and are part of the universe that Vance is inhabiting in his role as Ambrose Sond.

As seen previously, particularly in The Princess and the Fangirl, the story contains commentary on clichés within literature and media, and the relationship between creators, their works and their fans. Bookish and the Beast looks at redemption arcs in particular, bad and ‘evil’, and how the portrayal of true love and destiny could use some more complexity and the subverting of expectations. It also contains an excellent range of representation, handles dealing with grief in a sensitive manner, and has relationships written with real warmth and an ease of affection that makes the characters a joy to read about. As with the other Once Upon a Con books, this was another that I didn’t want to end, and I hope this isn’t the last we see set in this universe.

Though each of the books in the series follows a different set of characters in the spotlight, what I love about each new instalment is that we get to hear about the characters from previous novels and encounter those the reader has heard about or has had perhaps a more minor role in a different way. For example, in Bookish and the Beast, the reader learns what is happening between Darien and Elle and what is impacting their relationship, and Imogen and others from The Princess and the Fangirl also get some screen time and have a hand in how events play out. Each of the universes (for is the series not a story about a story, about a story?) is connected nicely and there is an excellent sense of continuity, both in the ‘real’ world and the imagined series, the making and the fandom of which brings the characters together.

Bookish and the Beast is out on August 4th and is the perfect variety of warm-hearted escapism that we could all do with right now. I would recommend picking up the whole series, but each book can be read as a standalone story and doesn’t rely heavily on prior knowledge about particular characters. Thank you, Quirk Books, for sending me an ARC!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *