Browsed by
Tag: Here the Whole Time

Review: Here the Whole Time by Vitor Martins

Review: Here the Whole Time by Vitor Martins

Felipe is fat. And he doesn’t need anyone to remind him, which is, of course, what everyone does. That’s why he’s been waiting for summer: a break from school and the classmates who tease him incessantly. His plans include catching up on TV, finishing his TBR pile, and watching YouTube tutorials on skills he’ll never actually put into practice.

But things get a little out of hand when Felipe’s mom informs him that Caio, the neighbour kid from apartment 57, will be spending the next fifteen days with them while his parents are on vacation. Felipe is distraught because A) he’s had a crush on Caio since, well, for ever, and B) Felipe has a list of body image insecurities and absolutely NO idea how he’s going to entertain his neighbor for two full weeks.

Suddenly, the days ahead of him that once promised rest and relaxation (not to mention some epic Netflix bingeing) end up bringing a whirlwind of feelings, forcing Felipe to dive head-first into every unresolved issue he has had with himself – but maybe, just maybe, he’ll manage to win over Caio, too.’

Here the Whole Time opens with Filipe looking forward to a summer where he’ll no longer have to endure the torment of attending school, where his peers mock and bully him for being overweight, going out of their way to draw attention to what they think is wrong with his appearance and make assumptions about his lifestyle and who he is. Knowing that he’ll not have to interact with anyone he doesn’t choose to is a huge comfort that he’s been clinging to, but this is abruptly taken away from him when he’s informed by his mother that they’re going to have a house guest in the form of the boy from next door: Caio, who Filipe used to be friends and swim with when they were much younger – before his insecurities about his appearance and sexuality meant he no longer felt comfortable doing as he used to. Having Caio is such close quarters threatens to be a nightmare for Felipe, who is embarrassed about his hobbies and appearance… and a little bit in love with him from afar.

When Caio moves in, Felipe is panicked by numerous things, such as having to try and make conversation, which is something he struggles with, and being near to him in any way that might make what he perceives as his physical flaws more obvious. He expects Caio to be as judgemental as his classmates, but soon finds that they are not so dissimilar and that Caio too has worries of his own, for all he appears more outwardly confident about his sexuality. With encouragement and guidance from his therapist and his mother, he gradually opens up to Caio about his insecurities and learns that he isn’t the only one to suffer from such feelings – and that what he thinks of himself and has been reinforced by his peers isn’t true. As the two grow closer, he’s introduced to Caio’s friends and begins to build the confidence to stand up to those who have been tormenting him at school and well as to be more open about his interests and what he enjoys. Their relationship feels like a natural progression as they learn more about each other and try to be honest about their hopes and fears, while starting to share what they love and find more common ground. They’re respectful of each other’s boundaries and Caio is particularly patient with Felipe, knowing that his insecurities are no small thing to be cast aside so easily, and that what he sees in Felipe and what he feels about himself are two different things.

One of the things I really liked about Here the Whole Time is how supportive Felipe’s mother is of him, and how she very quickly realises that Caio may not have the same sort of relationship with his mother and would benefit from the same sort of affection that she shows her son. She doesn’t see Caio as just a boy she’s agreed to host and look after, but makes him part of her family and treats him as she does Felipe, encouraging him to join in with their traditions and things that she thinks he’ll enjoy. She has a good heart and it’s obvious that she wants what’s best for her son, while genuinely caring for Caio. There are times when she seeks to encourage Felipe to take steps that are outside his comfort zone in terms of socialising, yet she isn’t forceful or unkind in trying to expand his horizons, and is just as supportive of that which she knows he enjoys and what makes him happy. It’s obvious that she knows her son very well and it was lovely to see a parent in such a caring and loving role, when all too often books that have similar subject matter have a parent as a negative force (this is not to say that all the parents in Here the Whole Time are as supportive as she is), as can too frequently unfortunately be the case in reality.

Here The Whole Time is a cute and fun read, and a beautiful story, out on 21st January! Thank you to TeamBKMRK for sending me a copy for review!