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Review: The Once and Future Queen by Clara O’Connor

Review: The Once and Future Queen by Clara O’Connor

‘Londinium, the last stronghold of the Romans left in Britannia, remains in a delicate state of peace with the ancient kingdoms that surround it. As the only daughter of a powerful merchant, Cassandra is betrothed to Marcus, the most eligible bachelor in the city.

But then she meets Devyn, the boy with the strange midnight eyes searching for a girl with magic in her blood.

When a mysterious sickness starts to leech the life from citizens with Celtic power lying dormant in their veins, the imperial council sets their schemes in motion. And so Cassandra must make a choice: the Code or Chaos, science or sorcery, Marcus or Devyn?’

Please be advised that the following review contains spoilers.

Cassandra is the daughter of a wealthy merchant, soon to complete her schooling, make a politically advantageous marriage, and have everything that she has been led to believe she ought to dream of. Unfortunately for her, she has lived her life in a very safe and rather spoiled bubble, which has never truly invited her to question the world around her, and when she begins to notice that which doesn’t fit with her view of society, she takes steps down paths that she cannot turn back from. Her world is not that which everyone experiences, the history she knows is not necessarily true, and even she may not be the person she has been led to believe she is.

The Once and Future Queen takes place in a future where the Roman system of governing is still firmly in place. As a Classicist, I found this an intriguing concept and, though not everything in this respect is accurate, that we live in a society that has so many features that can still be traced back to ancient civilisations, I enjoyed reading about a technologically advanced future with prominent Roman aspects. In terms of accuracy, you cannot expect a society that has developed over hundreds of years to absolutely still contain its original elements in their complete and unchanged entirety. I liked the contrast between technology and the aspects of society that it hasn’t managed to subsume, which may say more about human nature than our willingness to embrace science and tech. Both Roman history and that of the Britons in the story has been intertwined with myth and warped for creative purposes to create a universe-specific history (what Cassandra and others know of which may or may not be the whole truth as we go through the series, I’m sensing). I love reading about politics, and the matching system is something quite horrendous to entertain as a future, used essentially as a system of arranged marriages for genetics/economic prosperity/power and other elements I’m sure we don’t hear of, akin to the ancient system and one that we truly aren’t even a hundred years past at this point. Ultimately, I feel was most engaged in reading about the history of how society had developed and what links had been forged between those beyond the wall and not permitted outside the city in the name of a supposed peace, when it’s very evident that it is anything but.

I’m not sure whether the ages of the characters in the book have been adapted over drafts and edits, as I admit I wasn’t ever too sure exactly what age Cassandra is meant to be. When Devyn reveals his actual age and what he’s been doing for several years, it’s something that makes their relationship unsettling, if I’m honest. It’s made a little clearer late in the book that she’s in her twenties, but she is written as a young woman who behaves in a much more immature way. This said, given that The Once and Future Queen is set in a society where women appear to be shielded from society in some similar ways to the Roman source material, that she isn’t wise in the ways of the world or used to making her own choices of a more serious nature is not surprising. In more ways than one, she’s been brainwashed by her family and those around her – as is everyone else, it seems – and I hope we see develop a little more as the series unfolds. Her story and what different worlds want from her, in that she has been manipulated, suppressed and has the pressure of Devyn’s desperate belief in who she could be, makes for a read composed of twists and turns as different ‘truths’ come to light and more than one character has to decide which side they’re on and what they want out of life.

I will say that I found the last quarter of the book somewhat discomforting, in that one of the key plot points revolves around the fact that Cassandra is put under the influence of a device that alters her thoughts, feelings and essentially removes her body autonomy. It’s said that this is done routinely to couples in this universe, as love matches no longer exist with everyone matched by the Code, and to ensure that there is ‘affection’ and that couples sleep together, they’re first put under the influence of something that alters their personalities and interest in their partner, then drugged into wanting to. That Cassandra and Devyn’s first sexual encounter happens while she admits to being rather under the influence – and that her reaction afterwards is painted as immediate regret – simply doesn’t sit right and I’m afraid it coloured my reading of the book. Cassandra spends much of the last hundred pages unable to conclusively make her own choices, fooled into believing she is content with her life, which I think would have worked in a more comfortable manner were there not to be the question of physical intimacy with either of her potential partners.

All in all, I enjoyed the history, the politics and the technological features of society, but the romance didn’t really work for me. This said, I’ve mentioned before that I tend to find a lot of romances in YA fiction somewhat problematic, and I’m much more focused on political threads and societal commentary.

The Once and Future Queen is out on January 21st! Thank you, One More Chapter, for sending me a copy for review!