Browsed by
Tag: The Ravens

Review: The Ravens by Kass Morgan and Danielle Paige

Review: The Ravens by Kass Morgan and Danielle Paige

‘At first glance, the sisters of ultra-exclusive Kappa Rho Nu – the Ravens – seem like typical sorority girls. Ambitious, beautiful, and smart, they’re the most powerful girls on Westerly College’s Savannah, Georgia, campus.

But the Ravens aren’t just regular sorority girls. They’re witches.

Scarlett Winter has always known she’s a witch – and she’s determined to be the sorority’s president. But if a painful secret from her past ever comes to light, she could lose absolutely everything…

Vivi Devereaux has no idea she’s a witch. So when she gets a coveted bid to pledge the Ravens, she vows to do whatever it takes to be part of the magical sisterhood. The only thing standing in her way is Scarlett, who doesn’t think Vivi is Ravens material.

But when a dark power rises on campus, the girls will have to put their rivalry aside to save their fellow sisters. Someone has discovered the Ravens’ secret. And that someone will do anything to see these witches burn…’

What I enjoyed most about the The Ravens is its magic system, which isn’t terribly complex and does call on some common tropes for spellcasting, but I liked the use of the tarot deck and the fact that it felt that this magic could exist in the contemporary setting without hauling the whole story into more high-fantasy territory. If magic fits in comfortably with the more ‘modern’ features of the narrative and feels ‘believable’, if that makes sense. The story and its magic both read as very ready for television as concepts, and I could imagine this easily making the jump to a TV show for the younger end of the young adult audience. I admittedly was expecting something darker, given the blurb and the cover (maybe I fell into the ‘never judge a book by its cover’ trap!), and while there is some violence and the magic wielding does get a little bloody at times, the narrative stays largely on the lighter side of things, focused on relationships and hints about events that happened off-camera.

The story focuses on Scarlett, a member of a sorority with witchcraft at its heart (unbeknownst to the wider university population, though they have their suspicions) and Vivi, who has dismissed any potential for magic despite her mother trying to draw her into its world. It’s in joining the Ravens that Vivi begins to learn that magic is real and not a series of tricks, and starts to unlock her potential as a witch. The only problem is that Scarlett has already taken against her for associating with her boyfriend and has been assigned as her big sister. Scarlett’s focus is on becoming everything her family expects, including leader of the Ravens, while concealing what the more petty side of her nature has led her to do in the past. It’s unfortunate that the Raven sisterhood is precisely not a sisterhood – the girls very easily become jealous and judgemental, even though they keep insisting that they have each other’s backs. However, this is something that they more consciously realise over the course of the story’s events and learn that they have to put it to rights before they can become a real sisterhood and genuinely look after each other.

I’ve said this about romances in YA fiction before and I’m afraid I’m going to say it again: I think this book could have done without the insta-love plots. I got to the end of the novel and I was left wondering what either of the romances had brought to the story. Other than to set up the rivalry between the girls, I wasn’t really sure what purpose they served, and, if I’m honest, I’m really not a fan of girls being made to be rivals for a boy’s interest. Thankfully, both girls seem to realise that this isn’t something that should influence their own relationship, albeit rather late into events. The boy they’re both interested in doesn’t demonstrate any particular qualities that paint him as being worth getting jealous over – especially as he isn’t exactly painted as faithful in the first place. I guess I’m just a little tired of women being written to fight over men.

The Ravens is an interesting read and likely best suited for the younger to middle range of young adult readers. I think, in this instance, the romance and the bickering place it as a book more suitable for readers who enjoy slice of life/light fantasy television series aimed at teens. Thank you to Hodderscape for sending me a copy for review!